March 5, 2012

Vol. 27 , No. 10   


View Entire Issue (Vol. 27 , No. 10)


Whither the Euro: Some Reflections from the History of Fiscal and Monetary Unions
MICHAEL BORDO
MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2012
LUNCHEON 11:30 a.m.; LECTURE 12:00 p.m.

Michael D. Bordo is Professor of Economics and Director of the Center for Monetary and Financial History at Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey. He has held previous academic positions at the University of South Carolina and Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada. He has been a visiting Professor at the University of California Los Angeles, Carnegie Mellon University, Princeton University, Harvard University, Cambridge University where he was Pitt Professor of American History and Institutions, and a Visiting Scholar at the IMF, Federal Reserve Banks of St. Louis and Cleveland, the Federal Reserve Board of Governors, the Bank of Canada, the Bank of England and the Bank for International Settlement. He is a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He is also a member of the Shadow Open Market Committee. He has a B.A. degree from McGill University, a M.Sc.(Econ) from the London School of Economics and he received his Ph.D. at the University of Chicago in 1972. He has published many articles in leading journals and ten books in monetary economics and monetary history. He is editor of a series of books for Cambridge University Press: Studies in Macroeconomic History (1993).

Recent publications include: with Barry Eichengreen, A Retrospective on the Bretton Woods International Monetary System (University of Chicago Press, 1993); with Claudia Goldin and Eugene White, The Defining Moment: The Great Depression and the American Economy in the Twentieth Century, (University of Chicago Press, 1998); Essays on the Gold Standard and Related Regimes, (Cambridge University Press, 1999); with Alan Taylor and Jeffery Williamson, Globalization in Historical Perspective, (University of Chicago Press, 2003).

Professor Bordo is a guest of the Lowe Center for Political Economy.