November 7, 83

Vol. ii , No. 04   



ATHENAEUM MORE EXCITING THAN EVER

As you may realize from the size of this publication, the Athenaeum in its ever increasing popularity has managed to squeeze several exciting events in the short period before Thanksgiving. We have appealed to all fields of interest with the latest programs. For the movie buffs we are bringing you Jean Firstenberg and Fay Kanin, two of film makings most important women. For the sleuths we have a seminar on neighborhood crime control featuring Dr. Mangione and Dr. Rosenbaum who will speak on vigilance or vigilantism. For the more musically inclined we will feature a second piano recital. For those with an eye on future political careers we present Lyn Nofziger. And for those of you who are just hungering for a good meal we will present you with a Thanksgiving Dinner the likes of which only your grandmother has seen.

We hope that all of you will take advantage of the facilities we are offering and we will see you at the Athenaeum.




Women in Film-making
JEAN FIRSTENBERG
FAY KANIN
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1983

WOMEN PIONEERS OF FILM INDUSTRY TO SPEAK AT THE ATHENAEUM

Claremont - Film-making, a mere child as an art-form, has been shaped in recent years by two dynamic, imaginative women: Jean Firstenberg, Director of the American Film Institute, and Fay Kanin, immediate past President of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. On November 16, beginning at 5:30 p.m., there will be a reception and dinner in honor of these two innovative leaders, followed by a conversational interview.

Jean Firstenberg, a graduate of Boston University's School of Communications, worked in radio prior to her involvement in the movie industry. In 1965 she organized American participation in the Moscow Film Festival, this experience serving as a foundation for her future in the academic aspects of film and television.

Since 1980, Ms. Firstenberg has served as the Director of AFI, the only organization of its kind in the United States. Chartered by Congress to support scholarship, this center for advanced film study has its national headquarters in Washington, D.C., and a school for graduate work in the Southern California area.

Fay Kanin is one of the first women to delve into the frustrating task of actually creating the basis upon which every film is made--screenwriting. Beginning with study at the University of Southern California, like Ms. Firstenberg she gained experience through an association with radio, working for RKO. Ms. Kanin's list of successes is extensive, earning an Oscar nomination for her co-authorship of "Teacher's Pet," (1958) starring Clark Gable and Doris Day. The film "Friendly Fire" (ABC, 1979) won her an Emmy, a work she coproduced as well. For "Hustling," (ABC, 1975) Ms. Kanin received the Writer's Guild Award.




The Political Process
LYN NOFZIGER
WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16 & 17, 1983

LYN NOFZIGER BARES ALL

The John Brown Cook Association is excited to present Lyn Nofziger to the Claremont students and faculty on November 16th and 17th.

Mr. Nofziger was President Reagan's advisor for political affairs early in the administration and is today Senior Advisor to "Reagan-Bush '84." In addition to being a member of the "kitchen cabinet," he has emerged in recent years as a political analyst of national prominence, interviewed by networks and national magazines such as Time and Newsweek.

Lyn Nofziger will reside in the MMC Athenaeum guest apartment and make several appearances on campus during his visit. Students and faculty are cordially invited to attend a luncheon held in his honor at noon on Thursday, November 17th in the Security Pacific Room of the MMC Athenaeum. Take advantage of this event and send in your response sheet provided on the following page.





The Police Professional vs. the Neighborhood Crime Fighter: Relative Strengths and Weaknesses
DENNIS ROSENBAUM '74
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 1983

The Hartford Crime Control Experiment: Defensible Space and Practical Politics
THOMAS MANGIONE '69
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 1983 8:00 p.m.

NEIGHBORHOOD CRIME CONTROL: VIGILANCE OR VIGILANTISM?

The Participants. This Athenaeum event evolved from a happy circumstance. At a recent national convention, Professor Snorturn recognized two familiar names from a panel of experts on citizen crime control: Dr. Thomas P. Mangione, Center for Survey Research, University of Massachussets; and Dr. Dennis P. Rosenbaum, Center for Urban Affairs and Policy Research, Northwestern University. Even though the two panelists had served together on similar programs in the past, neither knew that they shared a common heritage as psychology majors at CMC-class of 1969 and 1974, respectively. They have been invited back to CMC for a double purpose: First, to tell us about their research on neighborhood crime control; and, second, to talk informally with students about opportunities for graduate study and employment in public policy analysis.

The Issues. Citizen involvement in neighborhood crime control is controversial. Police professionals are uneasy about assigning responsibility to citizens (especially cocky, young citizens like the Guardian Angels) to patrol back streets and subways. Police tend to prefer programs such as "target hardening" or "neighborhood watch" which operate under clearer lines of police authority. Skeptical social scientists challenge the effectiveness of any of these approaches and some suspect that citizen anti-crime programs may actually contribute to the breakdown of neighborhoods by generating a siege mentality. This symposium will review these issues and will examine the results of two of the most sophisticated crime control experiments in the U.S.




MADRIGAL FEAST CLOSE TO SELL OUT POINT

As of this printing, tickets for the Tudor Feast on November 30, December 1 and 2, 1983 are dwindling rapidly. To ensure a good seat we suggest that you call and make your reservations immediately. Ext. 8244. Students with valid meal cards $5.00, without meal cards $7.00, faculty and staff $10.00 and guests $18.00.




Thanksgiving Dinner
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 1983

Beginning November 18, the Athenaeum is requesting that all students fast in preparation for the November 22 Thanksgiving Dinner. Commencing at 6:00 p.m., this feast will rival even YOUR mom's best, so please arrive faint from hunger to benefit fully from all this abundance.




Piano Recital
KAREN CLARK
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 1983 3:00 p.m.

The second recital in the musical series, "Notes You Don't Have To Study," will be held on Sunday, November 13 at 3:00 p.m. Virtuoso Karen Clark of the Claremont Graduate School will be performing compositions of Mendelsohn, Beethoven, and Chopin. This event, as all the others in this series, will be held in the Childs Lounge, the Athenaeum's version of Carnegie Hall. Refreshments will be served.