Trustee Tom Leppert ’77 Elected Mayor of Dallas

CMC Trustee Tom Leppert ’77 has been elected the mayor of Dallas, edging out opponent Ed Oakley, a three-term city council member, during elections held June 16.

Leppert, who will be inaugurated June 25, responded on his campaign Web site, saying, “On behalf of my family, volunteers and campaign team, thank you for your confidence and for electing me your next mayor. Together, we can make Dallas the greatest American city in which to live and work.”

Saturday’s victory was Leppert’s first-ever run for political office. Leppert, now retired, is the former chairman and chief executive officer of the Dallas-based Turner Corporation, a leading general builder whose landmark buildings and key historical projects include the United Nations, the Aquarium of the Pacific, the Kennedy Library, and the Tapei 101 Tower in Tapei, Taiwan.

The Dallas Morning News says Leppert’s victory was “launched from a crime-fighting, business-minded platform and was fueled by overwhelming support in the city’s northernmost neighborhoods.” Addressing supporters after his election, Leppert expressed his optimism: “We are going to have a new City Council and a new leadershipthat will work as a team to make this the finest city in America for our families,” Morning News reported.

Outgoing Dallas Mayor Laura Miller, who did not seek re-election, had this to say: “People responded to Leppert’s message of staying within our means and promising not to raise taxes, all while lowering crime, bringing economic development and improving the public schools.”

Leppert, who was an economics major at CMC and student body president, has credited his alma mater with giving him the tools to lead a global organization such as Turner.

Specifically, he says the College taught him the value of interacting with others.

After graduating cum laude from CMC, Leppert went on to Harvard Business School and later became a partner at the Los Angeles office of McKinsey & Co. Leppert was then selected from among 1,200 applicants to be a White House Fellow in the Reagan administration, where he honed his leadership style in the elite program, interacting daily with top government and Cabinet officials.