Unigo Ranks CMC as 4th Most Politically Active Campus in America

Claremont McKenna College has been ranked fourth by Unigo.com on its just-released list of The 10 Most Politically Active Schools in America (read more).

“Being political can mean different things to different students at different schools,” reads the June 11 article, posted on Unigo’s Web site. “To some, it is embracing social consciousness in everyday life: recycling, putting your money where your mouth is, and acting tolerant. To still more, being political is a business, a career path that might very well be financially lucrative in the near future.”

Unigo.com, a free Web site launched just over a year ago as a lively repository for information on hundreds of colleges and universities, reports surveying 15,000 college students to determine the top-10 most politically active campuses. Among those who also made the cut, American University topped the list, followed by George Washington University (second), and CMC neighbor, Pitzer College, third.

Comparing Claremont McKenna to third-ranked Pitzer, the article described CMCers as “more conservative and more athletic The academic focus is on economics and public policy, and many students choose to study abroad, or [in] the Washington Program.” It also noted CMC’s “influential Associated Students of Claremont McKenna College, the student government,” as another doorway for students to get involved in politics.

It’s not the first time Claremont McKenna’s gotten notice for its politically active climate. In the 2005 edition of Princeton Review’s Best 357 Colleges, CMC was rated No. 1 in the category of Most Politically Active campuses.

Claremont McKenna also was named “Hottest College in an Election Year,” in Kaplan/Newsweek’s 2008 How to Get Into College guide, based on the CMC tradition of passion for politics and civic engagement.

In its rankings, Kaplan/Newsweek noted how “two of every five CMC students major in government/international relations. Most of the rest are also talking politics, the campus obsession.”