Silicon Valley Program

EA's Nancy Smith P'13 Presentation

There has never been a better time to join the games industry or Electronic Arts. While still a relatively young industry, gaming has achieved phenomenal success and continues to grow at an incredibly rapid pace - even surpassing the Hollywood box office in terms of annual revenue. EA, as a leading developer and publisher in the industry, earned more than $3 billion annual revenue in FY07 (with a market share exceeding 20%), with projections to double that figure within the next 3 years.

Nancy Smith, Executive Vice President, Global Publishing at Electronic Arts, addressed the Silicon Valley Semester, ITAB, and technology-bound students at the Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum on Thursday, April 5, 2012 to discuss various careers for liberal arts students in technology and at EA. An enthusiastic supporter of Claremont Colleges students and the power of a liberal arts education, Ms. Smith has graciously welcomed the ITAB delegation to EA for three years.  She also has expressed a sincere interest in hiring students for the Silicon Valley Program and summer internships.

Ms. Smith was named Executive Vice President, Global Publishing in February 2010. From November 2008 until February 2010, Ms. Smith served Electronic Arts in a variety of capacities. From September 2005 until November 2008, she led The Sims Label, first as Executive Vice President and General Manager of The Sims Franchise, and then as President of The Sims Label. From March 1998 until September 2005, she served as Executive Vice President and General Manager, North American Publishing. From October 1996 to March 1998, Ms. Smith served as Executive Vice President, North American Sales. She held the position of Senior Vice President, North American Sales and Distribution from July 1993 to October 1996 and Vice President Sales from 1988 to 1993. From 1984 to 1988, Ms. Smith served as Western Regional Sales Manager and National Sales Manager. Ms. Smith holds a B.S. degree in human relations and organizational behavior from the University of San Francisco.